Standard lenses

 40/1.8  KONICA HEXANON AR

 

 

 

Specifications:

Field of view

Elements / groups 

Aperture system

Aperture Scale

Metering

Closest focusing distance

Filters

Hood

Length

Diameter

Weight (~)

Years of production

Number of versions

Rarity

56º

6/5

Automatic

1.8 to 22 + AE

At full aperture

0.45m

Screw-in, 55mm

Screw-in, 55mm

27mm

63mm

140g

1978-87

1

● ●

Optical diagram:

 

Comments:                                                                                                                                                                   

There isn’t a bad lens among the seven Hexanon standards: two enjoy cult status, three are absolutely outstanding, albeit in different ways, while the remaining two are very solid performers. The Hexanon 40/1.8 is one of Konica’s most popular lenses. It has earned a legendary reputation for its sharpness. In 1979, Modern Photography magazine said of this lens that it ‘proved in resolution to be one of the best tested on any camera, regardless of cost.’ The Hexanon 40/1.8 is a very good choice for photographers who prefer a wider perspective than that of the traditional 50mm standard lens and need the f1.8 aperture. This lens produces images with great color saturation and an unusual bokeh that can be quite intriguing. Its very high contrast makes it a great lens for B&W photography. Very thin and light, known as the pancake, it is the smallest Hexanon made. Introduced as the standard lens on the Konica FS-1 electronic SLR, it is a very common and not very expensive. It is the first Hexanon lens whose manufacturing was contracted to Tokina and the first Hexanon automatic lens with the thin aperture ring and f22 stop. 

 

 50/1.4  KONICA HEXANON AR

 

 

 

Specifications:

Field of view

Elements / groups 

Aperture system

Aperture Scale

Metering

Closest focusing distance

Filters

Hood

Length

Diameter

Weight (~)

Years of production

Number of versions

Rarity

48º

7/6

Automatic

1.4 to 16 (22) + AE

At full aperture

0.45m

Screw-in, 55mm

Screw-in, 55mm

45mm

63mm

290g (265g)

1973-87

2

● ●

Optical diagram:

 

Comments:                                                                                                                                                                     

Lenses with a focal distance of 50-58mm have long been used in 35mm photography as standard, general purpose lenses, whose perspective is considered closest to that of the human eye. There isn’t a bad lens among the seven Hexanon standards: two enjoy cult status, three are absolutely outstanding, albeit in different ways, while the remaining two are very solid performers. The Hexanon 50/1.4 replaced the 57/1.4 in 1973. It produces an image that is somewhat sharper than that of the 57/1.2 and barely less so than that of the 50/1.7. A great lens for shooting slides, it produces images with wonderful color rendition. Its compact version, introduced in 1976 with the Autoreflex TC, has an aperture that closes down to f22, no longer has half-stops on the aperture ring and has 8 aperture blades. The two versions are of identical optical construction and both are as good as any other standard lenses offered in their day, if not better.

  

 50/1.7  KONICA HEXANON AR

 

 

 

Specifications:

Field of view

Elements / groups 

Aperture system

Aperture Scale

Metering

Closest focusing distance

Filters

Hood

Length

Diameter

Weight (~)

Years of production

Number of versions

Rarity

48º

6/5

Automatic

1.7 to 16 + AE

At full aperture

0.55m

Screw-in, 55mm

Screw-in, 55mm

45mm (40mm)

63mm (63mm)

240g (210g)

1973-87

2

Optical diagram:

 

Comments:                                                                                                                                                                     

Lenses with a focal distance of 50-58mm have long been used in 35mm photography as standard, general purpose lenses, whose perspective is considered closest to that of the human eye. There isn’t a bad lens among the seven Hexanon standards: two enjoy cult status, three are absolutely outstanding, albeit in different ways, while the remaining two are very solid performers. The 50/1.7 replaced the 52/1.8. It’s probably the most frequently encountered standard lens on Konica bodies after 1973. This lens has the reputation of being one of the sharpest ever made in this focal length by anyone. The compact version has no half stops on the aperture ring and was introduced in 1976 with the Autoreflex TC. In contrast to the compact version of the 50/1.4, its smallest aperture value is f16. The older version focuses about 8cm closer than the new one and its front element is slightly recessed. It is most probably the most common of Hexanon lenses and can often be bought for an almost symbolic sum. Both versions are of identical optical construction and are better than most other standard lenses offered in their day. 

 

 50/1.8  KONICA HEXANON AR

 

 

 

Specifications:

Field of view

Elements / groups 

Aperture system

Aperture Scale

Metering

Closest focusing distance

Filters

Hood

Length

Diameter

Weight (~)

Years of production

Number of versions

Rarity

48º

5/6

Automatic

1.8 to 22 + AE

At full aperture

0.55m

Screw-in, 55mm

Screw-in, 55mm

33mm

62mm

175g

1978-87

2

Optical diagram:

 

Comments:                                                                                                                                                                     

Lenses with a focal distance of 50-58mm have long been used in 35mm photography as standard, general purpose lenses, whose perspective is considered closest to that of the human eye. There isn’t a bad lens among the seven Hexanon standards: two enjoy cult status, three are absolutely outstanding, albeit in different ways, while the remaining two are very solid performers. The 50/1.8 is one of the latter two and the last of Hexanon standard lenses. It was considered something of a ‘budget’ standard lens when first introduced. The first version was made of metal, while the second (introduced in 1985 with the TC-X) is made of plastic. Both versions are good lenses, but not as good as the f1.7. The manufacturing of this lens was contracted to Tokina. 

 

 52/1.8  KONICA HEXANON AR

 

 

 

Specifications:

Field of view

Elements / groups 

Aperture system

Aperture Scale

Metering

Closest focusing distance

Filters

Hood

Length

Diameter

Weight (~)

Years of production

Number of versions

Rarity

45º

6/5

Automatic

1.8 to 16 + EE

At full aperture

0.45m

Screw-in, 55mm

Screw-in, 55mm

41mm

65mm

210g

1965-74

2

Optical diagram:

 

Comments:                                                                                                                                                                     

Lenses with a focal distance of 50-58mm have long been used in 35mm photography as standard, general purpose lenses, whose perspective is considered closest to that of the human eye. There isn’t a bad lens among the seven Hexanon standards: two enjoy cult status, three are absolutely outstanding, albeit in different ways, while the remaining two are very solid performers. The 52/1.8 is one of the latter two. It is one of Konica’s first standard lenses and was very frequent on the company’s first SLRs, the Auto-Reflex and the Autoreflex T. It was the slower and more affordable standard lens than the 57/1.4. It is a quite sharp lens, if not as much as the 50/1.7 that replaced it. 

 

 57/1.2  KONICA HEXANON AR

 

 

 

Specifications:

Field of view

Elements / groups 

Aperture system

Aperture Scale

Metering

Closest focusing distance

Filters

Hood

Length

Diameter

Weight (~)

Years of production

Number of versions

Rarity

42º

7/6

Automatic

1.2 to 16 + AE

At full aperture

0.45mm

Screw-in, 62mm

Screw-in, 62mm

50mm

72mm

480g (460g)

1967-87

4

● ● ● ●

Optical diagram:

 

Comments:                                                                                                                                                                    

Lenses with a focal distance of 50-58mm have long been used in 35mm photography as standard, general purpose lenses, whose perspective is considered closest to that of the human eye. There isn’t a bad lens among the seven Hexanon standards: two enjoy cult status, three are absolutely outstanding, albeit in different ways, while the remaining two are very solid performers. The 57/1.2 is a specialty lens designed for use in low light conditions. It produces images with beautiful color rendition and a wonderful bokeh. It is surprisingly sharp wide open, more so than most other such lenses, and becomes as sharp as the other Hexanon standards when closed down 2-3 stops. It is the only Hexanon standard lens which was made in more than two lens versions. The version with the rubber-covered aperture ring is the most desirable because of its better coatings. Paradoxically, it is also the most difficult to find. This lens enjoys cult status and many people claim it is the best f1.2 ever made by anyone. It and 7 other super-fast lenses were compared in a test conducted by Popular Photography in May 1976. The test found this to be the best of the eight, which included Canon, Nikon and Leica lenses. This lens was introduced along with the original Autoreflex T and was preceded by a 58/1.2, which was most likely the same lens.

 

 57/1.4  KONICA HEXANON AR

 

 

 

Specifications:

Field of view

Elements / groups 

Aperture system

Aperture Scale

Metering

Closest focusing distance

Filters

Hood

Length

Diameter

Weight (~)

Years of production

Number of versions

Rarity

 48º

6/5

Automatic

1.4 to 16 + EE

At full aperture

0.45m

Screw-in, 55mm

Screw-in, 55mm

42mm

65mm

290g (280g)

1965-72

4

● ●

Optical diagram:

 

Comments:                                                                                                                                                                    

Lenses with a focal distance of 50-58mm have long been used in 35mm photography as standard, general purpose lenses, whose perspective is considered closest to that of the human eye. There isn’t a bad lens among the seven Hexanon standards: two enjoy cult status, three are absolutely outstanding, albeit in different ways, while the remaining two are very solid performers. The Hexanon 57/1.4 was Konica’s first standard lens in AR mount and is usually associated with the Auto-Reflex and Autoreflex T cameras. It performs extremely well, but in other ways than the 50/1.4. Although it produces images with great color rendition, it is in black and white photography that this lens seems to excel most. 


 

“Many learned and skilled photographers preferred Konica glass. The 57/1.2 is thought to be as good as there is for a super-fast normal, the 85/1.8 is stunning, the 40/1.8 was described in a magazine article as the sharpest lens they had ever tested. I went through a phase of actively testing resolution back then and the Hexanons were always at the top of the heap when compared to photo club members' Nikon, Minolta, Canon and Pentax [lenses]."

Craig Schroeder



  KONICA